Thoughts about having AK as a hand

Big SlickThroughout the last three years, I have seen many different players having AK as their starting hand and have been amazed at how some people value and play them. Otherwise known as “big slick”, AK are perhaps the two most misplayed cards that anyone can get. In some of the lower buy-in Texas Holdem tourneys, some players will go all-in if they have AK, suited or unsuited, it does not matter.

Even players that don’t go all-in may continue to bet, to call, and not ever give up on the hope that just having AK will be enough to win the hand regardless of what is happening around them, what cards came up on the flop, or how many people have called them. I have seen AK beaten by a pair of pocket twos and heard them complain about the bad beat they got.

For what its worth, AK is a good starting hand pre-flop, not as good as pocket Aces or Kings, but worthy of some value. In all the reading I have done, AK is a good hand that also has good folding equity. What is meant by folding equity is that a good sized bet might cause others to fold, allowing you to win a hand uncontested. Of course, this works better at No Limit and Pot Limit Holdem as opposed to Limit Holdem where you can only raise or bet in fixed increments.

In ring or cash games, a recommended bet size of either 3 to 5 times the big blind in No Limit and a pot size bet in Pot Limit will usually be enough of a bet to take down or win the pot.

If you are called by one or more opponents, you need to consider what they might be holding to warrant a call from them. If called, you need to get a good flop for AK to survive. A flop containing either or both of your cards would be helpful but you also need to consider what your opponents might have as well.

They could hold pocket Aces or Kings, either of which will spell doom for your AK hand. There is always the chance that your opponent had a pocket pair of Queens or lower and the flop may have made them a set or trips (three of a kind). On a coordinated flop such as 7-8-9, you might be up against someone who always plays their J-10 suited or unsuited and have just hit their straight. Even though a flop of A-K-Q would give you top two pair, the J-10 opponent would have hit their straight again. You would only have four chances left to catch the remaining two Aces or two Kings to fill out with a full house.

Even a flop of two or three uncoordinated cards but all of the same suit could be a problem for you if neither of your two cards contained that suit. If your opponent had only one card of that suit, there are enough chances left that they could make the flush either at the turn or on the river. Of course you still might have the best hand so how you play it might depend or your stack size versus your opponents.

If the flop did not hit your hand but contained low uncoordinated cards, a continuation bet equal to the pot size might be enough to get your opponents to fold holdings of all but AA or KK. In a limit game, it sometimes is not even possible to drive out a player holding a pair of twos.

In either a cash game or tourney, I always have to consider folding my AK if I am faced with a re-raise, which would indicate a strong hand help by my opponent. I would also have to consider if I was being bluffed. But with AK, I still don’t have a made hand, just a good draw and faced with a re-raise I would have to have good pot odds before I would consider calling. I would lean to folding before committing more of my chips to the pot.

What are your thoughts about AK? Does it matter if they are suited or unsuited? Do you win well with AK? Have you overcommitted with them?

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Thoughts about having AK as a hand

  1. Hmm… There's a lot of questions to answer here so these are my thoughts;1. AK is always going to be 2nd best to deuces or any pocket pair but it's still the strongest unpaired hand you can have. You have to raise strongly pre-flop to make sure that you only have pocket pairs and A-x (high) with you. I would expect you will rarely get any more than 2 callers. If the flop hits low, you can still assume you're strong because you have (probably) got rid of any poor hands. This is the part where your ability to read your opponent is tested because they are unlikely to have hit a low flop but they may have a pocket pair. If you sense weakness you have to fire in another bet.2. Suited is better. Of course it helps to have suited cards and I tend to win more often with AKs but I wouldn't let the fact that the AK may be unsuited stop you playing it just as strongly.3. I tend to win around two-thirds of my hands with AK.4. I used to overcommit with AK all the time but I think that knowing when to fold is something you learn over time. I guess, you put it down to experience.

  2. Hmm… There's a lot of questions to answer here so these are my thoughts;1. AK is always going to be 2nd best to deuces or any pocket pair but it's still the strongest unpaired hand you can have. You have to raise strongly pre-flop to make sure that you only have pocket pairs and A-x (high) with you. I would expect you will rarely get any more than 2 callers. If the flop hits low, you can still assume you're strong because you have (probably) got rid of any poor hands. This is the part where your ability to read your opponent is tested because they are unlikely to have hit a low flop but they may have a pocket pair. If you sense weakness you have to fire in another bet.2. Suited is better. Of course it helps to have suited cards and I tend to win more often with AKs but I wouldn't let the fact that the AK may be unsuited stop you playing it just as strongly.3. I tend to win around two-thirds of my hands with AK.4. I used to overcommit with AK all the time but I think that knowing when to fold is something you learn over time. I guess, you put it down to experience.

  3. Pingback: Thoughts about having AK as a hand : DadsPokerBlog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s