When to move to the next level

Party Gaming Revenue from Poker 2002-2006
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Many of the books I have read have some advice  about when to move to the next level. While some of this advice varies, most of them say you should be winning at the level you are currently playing. While bankroll should be a consideration, many of these poker pros/authors say you can take the risk to move up – if you want to and can afford it.

Moving up to the next level does not mean you will make double what you were making at the current level as the players at the next level for the most part are better and tougher.

For myself, I will basically wait and see if I can run well in July and if I end the month in the black. I may try a shot at the next level and if I run badly, go back down a level until my play improves.

What determines the level you play at? Have you ever moved up a level and decided to go back to a more comfortable and profitable level of play?

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4 thoughts on “When to move to the next level

  1. Great post Steve. I've been thinking about this a lot lately. Remember when Patrick Sebastian challenged us to the 10 to 250 challenge? It was somewhat of a wake up call for me about bankroll management.With respect to online play, I've basically been unable to play at the levels necessary to exercise proper bankroll management techniques and play the games that I wanted to play. For example, a $50 initial deposit is too little to play the TPT which is a $5 buy in event. Risking 10% of your bankroll on a single buy in is just well above what you should be doing. So I created a separate Full Tilt account for the sole purpose of the challenge, and have stuck to the bankroll management techniques reccommended by Chris Ferguson in his $0 to $10k challenge. It's been a real grind, but I've been able to move up in levels twice, and have run my bankroll from $10 to just about $100. I'm still a long way away from the $250 goal, but I've been steadily increasing the bankroll, and only moving up in payscale when my bankroll tells me that I've been running positive enough to take the risk.But here's the more important thing, when I went through a rut, I moved down a level. I feel that it was VERY important to realize that when I wasn't winning at the higher level, instead of jepordizing my bankroll on players that had a likely higher bankroll (especially since they now had my money ;)), that I needed to eat a slice of humble pie, stand up, and move to another table with lower limits. I think that this is the mark of a good player. Being able to recognize limits that are acceptable to play within so that you're comfortable if you do lose. This is a game of skill, but it also has an element of chance/luck. And sometimes, the cards just don't fall your way. When you're on the one of the down swings, you have to know what your comfortable losing, and not jeopardize your entire bankroll with the swing. Moving up for me is just a simple matter of mathematics. If you've got the cash, you can take a swing at the bigger stakes for a percentage of your bankroll that you're comfortable losing. But when you don't have it, stay disciplined, and within the ranges that you're comfortable playing at.

    • Paul, as usual, you have a very detailed and reasonable approach to moving up in levels. I agree with all that you have said and I don't find it difficult to move down in levels when my bankroll is in jeopardy.. Thank you for the comments and thoughts about moving up and down levels.

  2. Paul, as usual, you have a very detailed and reasonable approach to moving up in levels. I agree with all that you have said and I don't find it difficult to move down in levels when my bankroll is in jeopardy.. Thank you for the comments and thoughts about moving up and down levels.

  3. Pingback: Guest Post - using comments by Paul Ellis of Pablosplace.com : DadsPokerBlog

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